We are a sixty acre farm in Bernardsville, NJ raising pastured lamb, pastured poultry and forest-raised pork. For the better part of the last 300 years, our land has been clear-cut, degraded, eroded, washed out, gullied, beat up and abandoned, not unlike most of the farmland in the eastern United States and, increasingly, the whole country. In 2013, our land's production hit rock bottom, forcing us to adopt regenerative practices that have turned the farm into an interconnected web of symbioses. We haven't looked back. Read on to learn about how each of our products improves soil and ecosystem health, and sequesters carbon: 

Mobbed Up Lamb: Our lambs are raised using the Three M's Principle: Mobbing, Moving, and Mowing. We keep them mobbed up using electric fencing. Keeping them in a herd transforms their behavior. The most important of these transformations is that they become less picky eaters, which improves the biodiversity of the pasture. Every day at 4pm, we move them into a new paddock, where tall grasses are waiting for them. The just-grazed pasture doesn't get touched again by the sheep for 2-3 months, allowing the grass to regrow and photosynthesize, turning carbon dioxide into sugars, which they store in their roots. When the mob comes back a few months later to mow down the grasses, the carbon-rich roots get sloughed off, becoming soil and indefinitely sequestering the carbon.

 The herd channeling the Corleone family

The herd channeling the Corleone family

Best Damn Chicken in the State: Our broilers are raised on pasture in small 10' x 12' x 2' shelters. They get moved to new pasture every day. Since they don't like tall grass, our birds follow the sheep around the pasture, helping to debug the parasites that plague the sheep by eating their larvae. Like the pigs, they receive a supplement of locally grown, non-GMO feed. Since we keep them sheltered at a considerable density, they leave behind a whooping 200 pounds of nitrogen rich manure per acre, which is just about the soil's carrying capacity at any given time. Within a week the nitrogen has been metabolized by the soil and verdant grass is growing lushly again.